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PHOTO CAPTION: Interior of Toyota Mirai hydrogen fuel cell sedan that goes on sale in Japan next month.

Test Drive: Toyota Mirai Hydrogen Fuel Cell Sedan

Auto Week's Mark Vaughn reports on his first drive in Toyota's first production hydrogen fuel cell car, the Mirai, which in Japanese means 'future'.

Published: 24-Nov-2014

Having pioneered and legitimized the hybrid electric car with the Prius 20 years ago, Toyota is aiming to do the same with hydrogen fuel cell electric vehicles as it launches the 2016 Mirai (the word means “future” in Japanese). The product of 20 years of R&D, the Mirai represents the peak of Toyota technology, with a fuel cell that is 30 times more efficient than the one it made in 1994, placed in a body purpose-built for the task.

The car sits on a “much-improved” ct200h/Prius platform and makes use of "improved" suspension, brakes and steering from those cars. Yes, it looks a little goofy on the outside, but manager of product planning and product engineering Shitoshi Ogiso said the look is purposeful.

“If this is the future, it better look futuristic,” he said.

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