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Think Electric Car Looking for Comeback

The Norwegian team behind the Think, a tiny two-seater electric-powered city car, aims to have a new-generation model in production next year. Pictured is Think Public concept vehicle.

Published: 01-Dec-2006

The Norwegian team behind the Think, a tiny two-seater electric-powered city car, aims to have a new-generation model in production next year. The Think project was bought by Ford in 1999, but Ford abandoned it in 2002, with around 1000 vehicles leased out in trial programmes in Europe and the US. There were protests in 2004 when Ford tried to scrap the cars, which had come to the end of their leases, and most are thought to have been shipped back to Norway for refurbishment and resale.

Think Nordic has since gone on to develop a new generation of battery-driven vehicles, capable of greater speeds than the original Think's 55mph and with an improved range between recharges, but has struggled financially, and it was declared bankrupt earlier this year. Now with new backing, it is recruiting workers for production and white-collar positions, and hopes to be running on full power shortly; the upcoming range could include delivery vehicles and even a mini-MPV as well as the passenger two-seater. Nissan, meanwhile, is reported to be working on an electric supermini, scheduled for sale in 2010. This will be considerably larger than its electric Hypermini city car, and capable of a good 120 miles between recharges. Nissan is also working on its own in-house hybrid system, which will replace the Toyota-supplied powertrain as used in the US-market Altima Hybrid.

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