Isle of Man TTXGP To Feature 'Green' Two-Wheelers in 2009

AThe race around the island's legendary 37.733-mile closed public roads circuit is open to 'clean emissions' two-wheelers, although at this stage the rules appear vague.

Published: 09-Aug-2008

The first of what is hoped will be an annual grand prix event, called the TTXGP, was announced this week at the Science Museum in London. Its backers include John Shimmin, the Isle of Man's Minister for the Environment, the British Motorcyclists Federation, motorcycle sport's UK governing body the ACU and the Motorsport Industry Association.

The race around the island's legendary 37.733-mile closed public roads circuit is open to "clean emissions" two-wheelers, although at this stage the rules appear vague, with some talking of zero emissions and others of allowing "clean" fuels such as hydrogen. There are also no restrictions on power or other aspects of design at this stage, although it's anticipated that this will become necessary as the series is developed.

According to TTXGP founder Azhar Hussain, more than 30 teams have expressed serious interest. The atmosphere surrounding the event is reminiscent of the original 1907 TT bike race, with a mix of enthusiasts, serious engineers and cranks taking part in a free-for-all race with few rules. But it was from this that motorcycle development accelerated at a rapid pace, and the hope is that something similar can be replicated with the TTXGP.

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