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PHOTO CAPTION: Ford Focus Electric lists for $39,995.

Ford Claims Focus Electric More Efficient Than LEAF

EPA rates the Focus Electric at 99 mpg equivalent in highway driving and 110 mpg equivalent in city driving.

Published: 05-Mar-2012

Ford Motor Co. (F)’s Focus electric car, going on sale in the first half of 2012, was certified by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency to offer the equivalent of 105 miles (169 kilometers) per gallon of gasoline, the automaker said today.
The battery-powered compact car has an EPA rating of 99 mpg equivalent in highway driving and 110 mpg equivalent in city driving, Ford said in a statement. The EPA established the mpg equivalent as a measure of the average distance traveled per unit of energy consumed so car buyers can compare electric vehicles and plug-in hybrids to conventional gasoline-powered autos.

The Focus Electric tops Nissan Motor Co.’s battery-powered Leaf, which is rated 99 mpg equivalent, and General Motors Co. (GM)’s Chevrolet Volt plug-in, which is rated 94 mpg equivalent, according to the U.S. Department of Energy. The EPA rated the Focus Electric as having a driving range of 76 miles on a single charge, while the Leaf has a 73-mile range, according to Ford.

The starting price for the Focus Electric is $39,995 and it is eligible for a $7,500 federal tax credit, said Wes Sherwood, a company spokesman. The Leaf starts at $35,200.

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