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Lack of Common Charging Standard in Europe Remains Hurdle

The UK has about 1,000 charging stations, while France has about 1,300 and Germany and Spain each have almost 900.

Published: 04-Dec-2012

The electric vehicle charging-station standardization issue that's viewed as a major hurdle to mass EV adoption goes far beyond SAE vs. CHAdeMO, apparently. European nations are also divided about which standard the European Union should use in its effort to build out the infrastructure necessary to ease away-from-home charging of plug-in vehicles, Ward's Auto reports, citing auto industry analysts at a Brussels conference.

Specifically, most European auto makers and auto suppliers are standing behind the Type-2 charging system backed primarily by Germany just as the European Commission starts an impact assessment for charging infrastructure, according to Ward's. Meanwhile, France is backing the Type-3 system, as Type-2 lacks a so-called "shutter" cover that's supposed to help prevent electrocution.

The issue is a major one as automakers such as France-based Renault look to spur plug-in vehicle sales, which have been slower than expected. Meanwhile, the UK has about 1,000 charging stations, while France has about 1,300 and Germany and Spain each have almost 900.

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