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PHOTO CAPTION: Quant e-Sportlimousine uses Nanoflowcell battery.

Flow Battery to Power QUANT e-Sportlimousine Concept

QUANT e-Sportlimousine electric concept car, a collaboration of NanoFLOWCELL and Bosch Engineering, will debut at 2014 Geneva Auto Show.

Published: 28-Feb-2014

NanoFLOWCELL AG and Bosch Engineering GmbH have formed a partnership: the first joint project between the wholly-owned subsidiary of Robert Bosch GmbH and nanoFLOWCELL AG is to further develop vehicle electronics for the QUANT e-Sportlimousine with nanoFLOWCELL® drive, which will shortly celebrate its world premiere at the Geneva Motor Show (4 March 2014).

“In the coming months and years, we will work with our system development partner Bosch Engineering GmbH on further development and international homologation of the QUANT e-Sportlimousine. Transforming an initial prototype with nanoFLOWCELL® powertrain into a series-production vehicle that can be used around the world is a big challenge. We are certain that we can manage it with this established and experienced partner,” said Nunzio La Vecchia, founder and head of development for the nanoFLOWCELL AG, underscoring the importance of the new partnership.

The headquarters of Bosch Engineering GmbH are located at the Bosch development center in Abstatt near Stuttgart. With over 1.850 employees worldwide, thereof 1.600 in Germany, this recognised systems development partner creates individual solutions for future mobility.

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